Colleges with applications and no essay - Venas News

In her view, two-thirds of this evaluation is based on tests, while only one third is based on grades, leading her to conclude at one point that grades were less important overall as a factor than test scores, while in a different chapter she also suggested that the high school transcript information described roughly 60% of the college's perception of a student's academic performance. Next, the composite score was combined with an analysis of personal factors such as extracurricular activity or the essay, such that the academic factor was weighted 70% to 85% while the personal evaluation was weighted only 30% to 15%. Generally the particulars of the mathematical formulas are not revealed to the public, and different colleges have different formulas. Part of the purpose of algorithms is to expedite the handling of thousands of applications in a short amount of time. For example, at , data goes into a for each application, which leads to a , where readers summarize applications; then, an initial screening is done: top applications go directly to the director of admissions for approval while lackluster ones go to another director. Dartmouth uses "A" for accept, "R" for reject, "P" for possible, with "P+" and "P-" being variants. A committee might spend a week with the "P" ones, of which they only accept about a sixth, according to Hernandez.

Colleges with no essays on the application - The Huntsville Track Club
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strong writing, and an authentic voice. While there is no magic topic that will automatically ensure admission at the college of your dreams, there are experiences everyone has that you can use to find your strongest possible application essays.


No essay college applications - BizzGang

There are no tricks and no shortcuts to writing the “perfect” college application essay. You just need to trust the process.
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The Common App, as it’s often called, is backed by a 35-year-old not-for-profit membership organization “committed to providing reliable services that promote equity, access, and integrity in the college application process.” Member schools evaluate applications holistically, weighing essays and into their decision as well as grade point averages and test scores. Like applications, the Common App requires students to enter personal, and information, scores, , community service and and and criminal histories as well as complete a short-answer essay and a longer personal (there are six prompts, including “topic of your choice”). The description alone is appealing but the statistics are the icing on the metaphorical : In the 2009-2010 admissions cycle alone, approximately 500,000 students submitted Common Applications to the more than 400 that accept it and admissions deans have said it helps to recruit more first-generation and .