Popular Application Essay Topics | Apply | The Princeton Review

Admissions committees deal with countless stacks of applications: faceless GRE scores and GPAs. The only way for them to differentiate among applicants with similar scores and academic backgrounds is to consult and read the essay/personal statement. Your personal statement reveals a great deal about your ability to write, to determine the purpose of the essay topic, to stick to a specified task, to sell yourself, and to explain why you are a good match to the school and program. Essentially, the essay is your opportunity to talk directly with the admissions committee, to call attention to important parts of your application that might otherwise be overlooked, and to explain any discrepancies or potentially negative aspects of your application. It's your chance to help the admissions committee see you as a person instead of a grade point average and standardized test scores.

Wondering what essay prompts you might see on your college applications
Photo provided by Pexels

Writing the graduate school application essay can be one of the most daunting parts of applying to grad school. These excerpts from can help you get started, with thoughts on brainstorming ideas, choosing a topic, and how to write an effective and powerful essay. Sample essays for the three professional degrees and a few select graduate programs are also included. For access to 100 free sample successful admissions essays, visit , the company calls “the world’s premier application essay editing service.” You’ll also find other great essay and editing resources (some free and some fee-based) at EssayEdge.


Business school admissions committees love these MBA essay questions

Tips for Writing the Grad School Application Essay. Even seemingly boring topics can be made into exceptional admissions essays with an innovative approach.
Photo provided by Pexels

A personal statement is a general type of admissions essay, most commonly found on applications to medical schools, residencies, graduate programs, and law schools. The average personal statement is 500-1,000 words in length and is meant to provide a fairly broad overview of the applicant. Topics covered include where an interest in the field of choice developed, how skill and experience have been built in that field, and goals/plans for the future.