3 Ways to Approach College Application Essays.

The college essay is your opportunity to let your personality shine on your application. Don’t waste it on the trite or cliché! Consider this approach instead.

to determine an appropriate approach to your own college application essay
Photo provided by Pexels

As a professional application-essay coach, I regularly encounter students with well-intentioned but misguided strategies for their college-application essays. And how students approach this task often determines acceptance or rejection. So here are The 7 Biggest No-No's to bypass when working on your essays:Yes, applying to college is a high-stakes game, and you want to avoid false moves. But if you breathe deeply and follow the above guidelines, writing the application essays can offer you interesting insights and your best shot at your dream school.


How to Approach College Admissions Essays | HuffPost

Writing the essay can be one of the biggest challenges in the application process. Learn how these students approached their college essays.
Photo provided by Pexels

In her view, two-thirds of this evaluation is based on tests, while only one third is based on grades, leading her to conclude at one point that grades were less important overall as a factor than test scores, while in a different chapter she also suggested that the high school transcript information described roughly 60% of the college's perception of a student's academic performance. Next, the composite score was combined with an analysis of personal factors such as extracurricular activity or the essay, such that the academic factor was weighted 70% to 85% while the personal evaluation was weighted only 30% to 15%. Generally the particulars of the mathematical formulas are not revealed to the public, and different colleges have different formulas. Part of the purpose of algorithms is to expedite the handling of thousands of applications in a short amount of time. For example, at , data goes into a for each application, which leads to a , where readers summarize applications; then, an initial screening is done: top applications go directly to the director of admissions for approval while lackluster ones go to another director. Dartmouth uses "A" for accept, "R" for reject, "P" for possible, with "P+" and "P-" being variants. A committee might spend a week with the "P" ones, of which they only accept about a sixth, according to Hernandez.